Responses

PDF

Original research article
Inception of the ‘endocarditis team’ is associated with improved survival in patients with infective endocarditis who are managed medically: findings from a before-and-after study
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    Multidisciplinary infective endocarditis care teams should address substance use disorders and harm reduction services
    • Thomas D. Brothers, Resident physician Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    • Other Contributors:
      • Duncan Webster, Associate Professor

    We read with great interest Kaura and colleagues’ evaluation of a multidisciplinary care team for hospital inpatients with infective endocarditis (IE) (1). The study provides further evidence for the effectiveness of a team-based approach to IE care – a model endorsed by both European (2) and American (3) guidelines. Despite limitations inherent in a before-and-after study design, it is clear that the IE team provides patients rapid access to cardiology, microbiology, and surgical care with coordination between services.

    Notably absent from this multidisciplinary approach, however, is care for substance use disorders. We wish to draw readers’ attention to the 10% of study participants for whom injection drug use (IDU) was identified as a predisposing factor in their IE. We believe a coordinated IE team offers enormous potential to provide addictions care and harm reduction services for patients with IE who inject drugs.

    Compared with people who do not inject drugs, people who inject drugs are far more likely to have recurrences and repeat hospitalizations for IE, and face increased mortality risk after a first episode of IE (4,5). Rates of hospitalization for IDU-associated IE also appear to be increasing (4,6–8).

    Evidence-based interventions can be provided in-hospital to reduce both rates of injecting and harms associated with ongoing injection. These interventions include initiating opioid agonist therapies (e.g. methadone or buprenorphine) for opi...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.