Table 3

Personal lives and work-life balance of female doctors in cardiology and non-cardiology specialties

Characteristic
Number (%) unless stated otherwise
Total
(n=423)
Cardiology specialists and trainees (n=57)Non-cardiology specialists & trainees* (n=366)P value
Age; median (IQR)37 (33–42)44 (37–54)36 (32–40)<0.001
Relationship status
 Partnered356 (84)43 (75)313 (86)0.10
 Single43 (10)7 (12)36 (10)
 Divorced/separated22 (5)6 (11)16 (4)
 Partner a doctor115 (27)23 (40)92 (29)0.002
Children
 Yes316 (75)40 (70)276 (75)0.40
Number of children
 0107 (25)17 (30)90 (25)0.39
 1–2250 (59)29 (51)221 (60)
 3 or more66 (16)11 (19)55 (15)
 Children during specialty training†138 (44)5 (13)133 (48)<0.001
 Nanny used for childcare†71 (22)20 (50)51 (18)<0.001
 Working hours per week
 Median (IQR)
42 (30–50)50 (40–60)40 (30–50)<0.001
 Hours at work,
 Median (IQR)
39 (27–45)42.5 (28–50)38 (25–45)<0.001
On call
 Almost never206 (49)16 (28)190 (52)<0.001
 Once per week152 (36)22 (39)130 (36)
 More than once per week64 (15)19 (33)45 (12)
Income
 Income<$100 00066 (16)1 (2)65 (18)<0.001
 $100 000–200 000233 (56)24 (44)209 (57)
 $200 000–300 00063 (15)10 (18)53 (14)
 >$300 00056 (13)19 (35)37 (10)
Type of practice
 Equal parts public/private41 (10)16 (28)25 (7)<0.001
 Predominantly private102 (24)13 (23)89 (24)
 Predominantly public280 (66)28 (49)252 (69)
  • *Excludes prevocational doctors.

  • †These sections are only relevant to those respondents who are parents, therefore proportions reflected as a percentage of those with children (in some instances, not all respondents with children answered each question).