Article Text

Chronic heavy drinking and ischaemic heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis
  1. Michael Roerecke1,2 and
  2. Jürgen Rehm1,2,3,4,5
  1. 1Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), Toronto, Canada
  2. 2Dalla Lana School of Public Health (DLSPH), University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  3. 3Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  4. 4Institute for Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany
  5. 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Michael Roerecke; m.roerecke{at}web.de

Abstract

Previous meta-analyses have reported either a protective, neutral or detrimental association from chronic heavy drinking in relation to ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We investigated the potential for systematic error because of study design. Using MOOSE guidelines, studies were identified through MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science up to end of March, 2014. Epidemiological studies reporting on chronic heavy drinking and IHD risk in population studies and samples of people with alcohol use disorder (AUD) were included. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool eligible studies. The I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity across studies. In total, 34 observational studies with 110 570 chronic heavy drinkers and 3086 IHD events were identified. In population studies among men, the pooled risk for IHD incidence (fatal+non-fatal events) among chronic heavy drinkers (on average ≥60 g pure alcohol/day) in comparison to lifetime abstainers (n=11 studies) was relative risk (RR)=1.04 (95% CI 0.83 to 1.31, I2=54%). Few studies were available for women. In patients with AUD, the risk of IHD mortality in comparison to the general population was elevated with a RR=1.62 (95% CI 1.34 to 1.95, I2=81%) in men and RR=2.09 (95% CI 1.28 to 3.41, I2=67%) in women. There was a general lack of adjustment other than sex and age in studies among patients with AUD. There is no systematic evidence for a protective association from any type of chronic heavy drinking on IHD risk. Patients with AUD were at higher risk for IHD mortality, but better quality evidence is needed with regard to potential confounding.

  • MYOCARDIAL ISCHAEMIA AND INFARCTION (IHD)

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