Responses

This article has a correction. Please see:

PDF

Original research article
Evidence from randomised controlled trials did not support the introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 and 1983: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

  • Published on:
    Re: Evidence from RCTs did not support introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 & 1983
    • Vivien S. Lund, SACN secretariat
    • Other Contributors:
      • Alison Tedstone, PhD RNutr, Chief Nutritionist, Louis Levy, PhD RNutr (Public Health), Vicki Pyne, RNutr (Public Health)

    Dietary advice that reducing fat and saturated fat consumption will reduce the risk of coronary heart disease was introduced in the UK in 1983. The authors of this systematic review and meta-analysis conclude that evidence from randomised controlled trials, available at the time, did not support that advice.

    It is important to highlight that the review looks at the results of just six relatively short-term ra...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Randomised controlled trials and diet-heart recommendations

    Re: Harcombe et al. Evidence from randomised controlled trials did not support the introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 and 1983:

    The claim made by the authors of this paper that guidelines on dietary fat introduced in the 1970s and 1980s were not based on good scientific evidence is misguided and potentially dangerous. Whilst it is important to ensure an ongoing interrogation of the evidence linking d...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Letter to the Editor: Evidence from randomised controlled trials not support the introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 and 1983: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    We would like to thank you for your interesting and helpful comments.

    We are currently finalising the follow-up paper, which is to consider all RCT evidence for current dietary guidelines before and since their introduction, to see if they have been supported in hindsight. We will review the risk of bias assessment tool, as suggested.

    We do accept the role that cohort studies can play but wanted to focu...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Letter to the Editor: Evidence from randomised controlled trials not support the introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 and 1983: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    With great interest we read the meta-analysis of Harcombe and co- workers titled "Evidence from randomized controlled trials did not support the introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 and 1983: a systematic review and meta-analysis" published in volume 2 of the Open Heart Journal [1]. In their article, the authors systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials investigating the associations between dietary fa...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Fascinating: So it was basically a political decision

    At last I know how these damaging and pernicious guidelines came about. They introduced a dark age of medicine and dogma that continues to effect my practice.

    How I struggle to get patients to accept eggs and butter as part of a healthy diet . It's my belief that sugar and other carbohydrates are the real problem.

    I have seen great results for 70 patients in my practice with the metabolic syndrome usi...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    More contradictions to the dietary guidelines

    Hopefully the meta-analysis by Harcombe et al. (1) may inspire the authorities to correct their dietary recommendations, because other studies have shown that the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA) does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Not only did the authors of the dietary guideline from 1977 and 1983 ignore the dietary trials; they also ignored several unsupportive cohort studies. Before 1...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.